Home / Sightseeing & Activities / Oude Kerk (Old Church) in Delft

Oude Kerk (Old Church) in Delft

Oude Kerk in Delft

The Oude Kerk (Old Church) in Delft sits among the oldest and most prestigious buildings that can be found in the city. This is probably the oldest standing structure that still exists in the city. Visiting this landmark is a must for most of the tourists as it offers a view on the rich history and art.

Overview

The Church was originally established as the church of St. Hippolytus during the 1050’s. But in the 13th century it was rebuilt by St. Bartholomew of Marde which gives rise to the name as Church of St. Bartholomew. But during the reformation, it became a protestant Church specifically a Calvinist. It is also famous for its burial site of the world renowned painter, John Vermeer on 1675. Up to the present it remains as one of the most remarkable heritage sites in Delft City.

What to Expect

The structure of the Church is of a typical Gothic architectural style. The interior shows an exquisite beauty of the columns and vaults which creates an impression of high medieval arts and society.

The Leaning Tower

The most noticeable structure that most of the tourists come to see is the leaning tower. The tower was established during 1325 to 1350.  The reason for this leaning of the tower is that, the canal was intended to be adjusted slightly so the tower could be built but through course of time the foundation of the tower became unstable thus making the tower to lean.

The Church Organ

The pipe organ adds to the beauty and the grandeur of the Church. The first pipe which is the main organ was built in 1857 while the second one which can be found on the northern aisle was built on 1873 and lastly the third one which is on the choir loft was built on 1770. The pipe organ gives the Church its angelic and heavenly feeling which makes your Church experience very unique.

The Church Bell

This huge bell was made in 1570 and weighs almost 9 tons. It was only used during special occasions like in the event of a disaster or during memorial services for the Royal Family.

The Church is usually open to the public every day except on Sundays where regular masses are held.